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the virus grows, if you follow the metaphor that bullying is a systemic virus, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that
't believe in that. we mean that every classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultural background and we don't couple that with behaviors that kids will display. and the other thing in terms of context that i want to make sure is clear and i didn't am happy you're here and we are fighting a battle against pop culture and the messages they receive on tv, logging on to the facebook page, logging on to all of the social media that is out there, think how many times in pop culture they refer to someone as "their little b, or little n" and that's just the way we greet each other and for someone that entered school only speaking spanish and you think about the language issues and in spanish i can tell you a whole bunch of terms that people use to great each other that are so racist, homo phobic and have a length and accepted as accepted and we need to work together and we're dealing with a culture we are trying to shift and in san francisco we are proud
into the environment. they have started work on a project to stop the contaminated water from escaping into the environment. workers for tokyo electric power company discovered three of seven underground storage pools are leaking. tepco officials believe pools one and two may be leak being the most. so they're placing priority on training them. on tuesday workers started transferring with 20 tons per hour from pool two to an above ground tank more than 400 meters away. officials say the process will be long. they plan to step up monitoring to make sure no water escapes during transfer. they estimate they'll be able to move more than 23,000 tons of contaminated water by early june. but the underground pools will continue to leak during the operation. crews will pump any contaminated water they collect back no the fool minimize damage to the environment. tepco officials say the volume of contaminated water is increasing by about 400 tons per day. they'll no longer use the underground storage pools and plan to install more above ground tanks. they're working on finding a way to decontamin
to concentrate and learn. so a school safety environment is no. 1 and we know that when you have that safe environment it's backed up by respect and trust, students will learn better, they will attend school better and academically they will do well and socially they will do well. so socially we're very concerned about implementing at the ground level these laws tom has led the way in enacting. >> but there are a lot of people who don't think this is an issue, unfortunately, sadly. i know you are a big believer in this in mental health and good physical health and the link to academics. could you talk about that, please? >> all the research points to having a healthy school environment, having health in your life, many students, a quarter of our students in california have poverty, a quarter of our children have no health care. what was a million students a year and a half ago is now a million and a half. when you have good nutrition and good health, you will learn better. it goes hand in hand with good mental health and a good school environment. the research points out, we want our k
that both leverages our economic success while preserving our environment and a complete neighborhood that is safer for our pedestrians, open spaces for workers. places to work that you can walk to and places to live, 30 percent which will be affordable for our residents here in san francisco which will ensure a diverse community in this part of downtown. we must improve and enhance our infrastructure which trul highlights san francisco as a world class city. i have had the opportunity to be more intimately involved in this process and i know you have done an incredible job. i have visited the tour and terminal that will improve our skyline. as a district supervisor for the south of market and district plan, i'm excite d that the existing residents will benefit from this neighborhood. i'm also proud to represent a city that is under taken such a large and complex project. mayor lee said we have to give thanks to our director, kaplan who has been our chief for years and to ensure a project happens like this on time. [ applause ] as an elected official i'm very sympathetic acknowledgin
gordon, jr. redress conditions reflect environment review. dictionary tends to provide dictionary -- dictatorial [speaker not understood]. we the people have addressed so many times. [speaker not understood] education, schooling, work is based upon capital currency [speaker not understood]. monopoly capitalist, imperialist, racialist, [speaker not understood], surrounding planet earth sovereign nations with military basins defending its interests. witness 77 6 victory of african-american negro slave owners, declaration of independence, [speaker not understood] amendment of the constitution, fortification of the nation. this is such a timing for heart beat cloaked, environment review with this media entertainment, advertising industry, supernatural in party, opposition, an aura of fascist language, inflections, market speculation, 2013 pitch, who's who, mental health, george washington, and thomas jefferson, african negro slave owners, presidents, [speaker not understood] democracy dictatorship. 17 76, 2013, this reading given two minutes. >> thank you very much. before the next sp
that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor
aspects. >> what better way to show that the puc cares about the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ test, test, test, test, test, test, test, test, test, test, test test >> welcome to the april 10th, 2013, the preceding office is chris fong and two commissioners. to my left a district attorney city attorney and that's the controls of the boards legal assistant. we
their children are in a high care quality environment. and people who take care of children for a living every day are very often not recognized especially in terms of compensation. the median income in the country for child care teachers is $11.14. san francisco i think might be a little bit higher but not by a lot. people who take care of their own children can't afford to take care of their families. i want to thank you for this honor. we look forward to working with you the next few years. our organization is really interested in helping make early childhood become a sustainable place to work, a highly professional, highly competitive work force where people can afford to care for their own families and we look forward to working with you all on that journey. thank you. (applause) >> thank you, supervisor yee, and thank you to the san francisco child care providers association and the family child care association of san francisco. colleague, we do have one more special commendation, but it will be offered at 3:30 jointly by supervisors farrell and breed. so, with that, madam clerk, why do
is threatened in any way, there is some awareness they are in that environment, number one. number two, what we found are a lot of the artists in our program are of the street culture. so, they know when tags are just tagging and what's vandalism, gang related or more serious. we had one particular incident at 65 oak grover, a beautiful mural, and it was slightly obliterated. he went back and fixed it. and then they came back and completely obliterated it. and he told me he could not go back up there because the people that did that would hurt him and he knew who it was. so, instead of hiring another muralist to go up there because he gave us that information, we just had -- we buffed it over and had a blank coat of paint put over it. so, in our program we can utilize the artists to get the information we need to keep them safe and also we let the police -- law enforcement know this program is happening and when it's happening so that they're hypersensitive to it. >> i'm going to go back over here and we have a couple comments. i think we're going to stick with this topic a little bit because i
of drivers produces an environment of teamwork. additionally there has been sefrmentd that local customers have made inquiries about the health of the drivers in san francisco. the idea has received great reviews. to the issuance of madalinas this program has produced the lease amount of - i would strongly encourage the enhancement of this program in the future >> (calling names). >> again evening board of directors. i want to thank the doctor on his report. i have a couple of concerns that were brought up on the town hall meeting. the w hotel is on the corner of third and howard. if you're coming down third on a rush hour period it's going to be about 5 tow 7 minutes because when everybody comes to that threshold of montgomery. if you look at june the 14th of that day there was a giant against the houston as atrocities which means south of marketing is a mess. so there are other drorgsz be made there. i want to thank the director for trying to get more inspectors to help with the enforcement hopeful that won't be nitpicking with a madalinas on your shoulder. it 50 should be a rent basis
is a matter of social justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see grown adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question
in our first panel, business creating a healthy safe and inclusive environment for all school students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing eve
... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] we didn't have u-verse back in my day. you couldn't just... guys... there you are. you know you couldn't just pause a show in one room, then... where was i... you couldn't pause a show in one room then start playing it in another. and...i'm talking to myself... [ male announcer ] call to get u-verse tv for just $19 a month for 2 years with qualifying bundles. rethink possible. oakland police announcing your rest of the murder, five suspects between 14 and 16 years ago have been taking into custody. we have video coming up of the scene boyer was shot and then drove his car down the hill. the suspects are so young is troubling. >> i am deeply deeply concerned by this by the fact that the person responsible for this man's murder ages range between 15 to 16 years old, unacceptable! we notice that the h for the suspect involved in many murders or robberies' are now between 14 and 17 years old. >> catherine >> catherine:president obama heads to boston thursday - for a the fbi is asking people to come for what many feel or anything t
. they are mostly used in environments for the environment, whether it be the sand in the desert or the jungle, it would interfere with the explosive. that has been traditionally their use. that being said, these things are easy to find, easy to make. i don't have to tell you, you can look up on the internet and see the step by step instructions out to do that. and matter of assembling the various ingredients you would do to put it together. that to expand on what he was saying, they are getting a lot of evidence how the bomb was made but they don't have a lot of evidence about who did this or why. the actual evidence that would lead to the person or persons involved. >> this suggests a slightly higher level of them what was first thought yesterday and if so, does that narrow down the net of potential suspects? >> it does. the black powder, the acetone, peroxide, you don't want to let it get went. absolutely right. you want to protect the explosives, the detonator. when this bomb went off, talked to a couple of people and their first reaction was what is happening to people coming back from af
the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and not part of that is education and we have to educate the adults that spend time with the kids and the federal government will come up with the giens and 37 factors or 40 and frankly most of us won't remember and unless we're prosecuting and looking for the elements of the crime and whether we're going to file a case or not. i i think we need to be more global than this and this works and we need to illustrate the things that aren't acceptable? what is the impact on the victim? what is the impact on everyone else? and working together to solve the problem. >> nancy. >> in some school districts and teachers when i brought up this issue i get back "you're not going to change kids being kids. some kids will pick on other kids and in the dynamic girls will be friends today and the queen bee will turn away from some girl and the enemy today and tomorrow it's somebody else, and again i agree with george and so much of this is the responsibilities falls on those adults who actually have a bird's eye ore worm's eye view of what is
on the security environment and based on the capability and capacity of the afghans who will serve -- supply the security when we draw down. ask 10never going to soldiers to do more than 10 soldiers were the work and we will shrink the perimeter figure in afghanistan the kids force protection first and foremost about. >> on facilities, you mentioned returning the situation back to the way it was before the facility was built. do we have a process we go through with the afghanis to decided they would like things re are of no value? >> we have a detailed plan for afghan infrastructure to sustain afghan forces post-2014. some of that is being transitioned from coalition forces to afghans. all the infrastructure above their ability to sustain over time, we have a detailed plan that links the infrastructure the afghans will maintain post- 2014 with the resources we project will be available to sustain that infrastructure and we want to make sure there's a balance between the projected resources and the numbers of facilities the afghans keep. those facilities that cannot be sustained are the ones
in this project. we truly appreciate coming to work in an environment that is sporting our good health and safety. so ultimately we can support yours. we consider this community our community, our home away from home. i would like to assure you that we remain committed to continuing our primary mission. that is to protect the lives and property of the people we serve. thank you very much. >> and so you can find out a little bit more about this facility. i would now like to call up the principal architect responsible for this facility. bill letty. with stacy architect. >> thank you, chief. you know, a little known fact is that every architect wants to design a firehouse. not just because many of us wanted to be fire fighters at some point in our lives, it's because these are really iconic hybrid buildings that we feel -- embody a building that express dignity and security for our community. these are important facilities for our community. when we are working on this project in the office we often joke that firehouse no. 1 is like a block on steroids with really big machines in the garage. it's
, they may be hurting others. bank of america became some of the highlighting in a low-rate environment. sf servicing more loans and making less money from them. a report card for the good and the bad of the fed's low rates! the housing market, especially mortgage borrowers, have been the biggest beneficiary that began in 2008. close to 20 million mortgages have been refinanced since then. mortgage applications were up about 5% last week and the mortgage banker's association says the purchase index is at its highest level in two years. >> homes are just incredibly affordable because of these very low rate that is have been there to push down interest rates. >> low interest rates are getting consumerinto auto-showrooms. new car sales could top $15 million this year and negotia negotiating monthly payments that take away much of the new car sticker shock. both consumers and businesses are paying off or refinancing debt. consumer refinancing is at its lowest level in a decade. approximately $70,000 per household. >> we've seen corporations clean up their balance sheets even more so. they've ta
water... and harm wildlife. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] pregnant woman may not haveo give-up alcohol. cbs reporter >>> welcome back. in today's healthwatch, a new study shows pregnant women may not have to give up alcohol. cbs reporter alison harmelin with the experts who say, light drinking may not be harmful to babies. >> reporter: first time mother sarah little made sure to eat a balanced diet while she was pregnant with baby aaron. the 31-year-old would also have an occasional drink. >> i had a glass of wine, i don't know, once every month? once every six weeks? just to enjoy with friends or relax. >> reporter: a new study suggests a little alcohol isn't harmful to a baby's development. researchers in england compared 10,000 seven-year-olds. a quarter had mothers who drank lightly. the others didn't. >> we looked at children's social, emotional and intellectual development and felt there were no differences in terms of harmful effects. >> reporter: heavy alcohol son sumtion during pregnancy is long linked to health and deve
answer. you can reduce the risk of an incident but you cannot create a fail/safe environment. certainly not along a 26-mile plus path that goes through commercial, residential areas. it is difficult enough at an ampitheater, race track, gymnasium, or stadium. i think we'll see in the future perhaps additional security but there are certain venues that it is very, very difficult to maximize to a point where you're fairly competent that nothing can happen and certainly a marathon is one of those kinds of events. as you and i both know every day in this country there are multiple venues where hundreds if not thousands if not tens of thousands of people for social, political, athletic reasons show up. so there will be lessons learned based on this tragedy. there will be probably a little more inconvenience down the road about -- i read with great interest that the london marathon is going on. pittsburgh is having a marathon next week. they have not canceled that. they're encouraging the runners to go. there was an interesting piece by tom friedman today in the "new york times." he basically
environment environment. i like the you have to pick your spots and be very aware what is going on around you. melissa: panel, thanks for your insight. we really appreciate it. >> thank you. melissa: coming up on "money" with have exclusive interview with the co-owner of the boston celtics what he is doing to make fans are safe at the game. this will change his way of doing business. oil falls to the lowest level in a month. we'll tell you why. plus what effect will the boston bombing have on the price of crude. stay right here. a lot more "money" straight ahead. melissa: so we have some breaking news to report. nfl broadcaster and icon pat summer all passed away at the age of 82. let's go to dennis kneale with more on this. >> hello, melissa, the beloved broadcaster, pat summerall died at age 82 in dallas. open employed a succinct staccato style and brief to the point. was 82 years old. he work ad record 16 super bowls on network television. was at cbs from 61 to 1993. then went from cbs to fox in 1994. he retired after the 2002 season but remain ad beloved figure in american broadcasting, e
that poison our water... and harm wildlife. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] ♪ ♪ if loving you is wrong ♪ i don't wanna be right [ record scratch ] what?! it's not bad for you. it just tastes that way. [ female announcer ] honey nut cheerios cereal -- heart-healthy, whole grain oats. you can't go wrong loving it. bee happy. bee healthy. with clusters of flakes and o's. oh, ho ho... it's the honey sweetness. i...i mean, you...love. . >>> welcome back to the show. don't forget to check out rightthisminute.com. you can see today's videos and more all day long. >> one of the many new cities and markets that "right this minute" is moving on into, buffalo, new york. >> buffalo! >> shout out to buffalo. what up? we're airing on abc channel 7 at 3:00 p.m. monday through friday and hope everybody in buffalo is passionate about watching our show. people in buffalo are already passionate about buffalo wings. >> love them. >> the big argument in buffalo between two different establishments. here's the website from anchor bar, which is the ho
... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] (cheers and applause). >> jon: welcome back! my guest tonight, his latest film is called "oblivion." >> technician 4-9, ships systems are green. i'm good to go. >> copy tech 4-9, you've cleared. >> good work on that. (laughter) >> jon: please welcome back to the show tom cruise! (cheers and applause) >> jon: . >> thank you very much. >> jon: the people love! they love! >> thank you. (cheers and applause) sit in the chair, for god's sake. >> thank you. >> jon: how are you? >> thank you so much. great, man. >> jon: nice to see you again. >> great to see you. >> jon: here's what i don't like about this movie. (laughter) >> yeah? >> jon: so you drop into pits on ropes on that wire, you're doing these flips and things and stunts and you did them and you're my age and it upsets me. (laughter) to no end. that's why -- because they said, you know, i go "he did some crazy stunts in this thing." >> and and they said "you know he's 50 now." and i said "no, i'm 50,". >> (laughs). >> jon: how are you still pulling that off? >> i don't kno
to get business pools fix for this environment, and we think this $52 million will be sufficient. >> i will end there, but i have other questions for the record. that last question was and did you and i have talked about that maximizes delivered to veterans in tough locations, rural locations, so i thank you for that effort. >> senator blumenthal? >> thank you, mr. chairman, and i apologize for being late, but i have been following some of the testimony and want to thank you all for your service, and, mr. secretary, particularly for your active-duty service to our nation and now in the department of veterans affairs, and to the president for increasing resources available veterans in a very difficult time to escalate. let me begin with senator begich's question relating to electronic health record. i understood that you describe what was going to happen, but i am not sure that i heard what the target date was. he asked for a target date for completing the program. >> we're talking about claims here. >> the electronic record system. recordelectronic help system is still going forward. >
back to what is a normalized environment. what does that even mean? i can't value it. i don't know how to value. >> i think it's interesting, the mainstream press. the front page of the washington post is the spring swoon and how we cannot seem to escape this economic decline and we've seen the past couple of springs and the front page of the journal is walmart and kohl's taking more time to pay their supplier, a trend they say is getting worse. those are not marginal positives, jim. i look at bank of america. i look at j.p. morgan and i say i'll pay 83.5 for 50,000 j & j. the trade is i don't want to mess with the stuff. proctor, look, he's making the quarter. he's going to make the quarter. >> raw costs coming down and coca-cola, by the way. raw costs are coming down, but they will come down. another one that is just where people are hiding. david, it's hide and don't seek. >> it is, but to carl's point, we've come out of the last few years and animal spirits start to feel strong. >> right. underlying economic growth is strong and everyone is revising up their gdp numbers up to three
and it's particularly challenging in this fiscal environment. the administration's $39 billion budget deficit request makes some very tough choices. it cuts the department's budget by roughly 2%, below 2012 levels. but it's the least consistent with what the congress appropriated in 2013 for the epartment. stepping back and thinking of all the challenges that our country and this department have faced since 2009, christmas day bomber, time square bomber, yemen cargo bomb plot, hurricane sandy and the ever-changing and ever-growing cyberthreat, and now the boston attack, it's easy to become concerned with this budget request. that said, we're facing extremely difficult budgetary times and sacrifices must be made. and while i recognize important missions may not receive all of the funds they or we would want in a perfect world, all departments and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required to iranian in our deficit -- rein in our deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. identifying some $1.3 billion in cost savings this year and m
environment. in my previous discussions with general allan, it is obvious the right level is closer to the 352,0020. that the 2013 and 2014 fighting seasons are critical to setting conditions for success and i worry that inadequate funding will erode the fighting capability of our troops on the front line. president's budget proposal last week has to address the unprecedented resource challenges facing our military and will hurt the readiness of our military. to preserve our place, the navy is tying up carrier strike groups. the air force is surrounding aircraft. the effect of this deteriorating readiness will be felt by the fighting forces in 2014, by the men and women we sent into combat next year. the president's must get serious about working with the congress on a lasting solution to the challenges facing our military. the troops fighting for this nation deserve nothing less. i think you very much -- i thank you very much. >> thank you. welcome. >> good morning distinguished members of the committee. i appreciate the opportunity to represent the men and women of the u.s. forces of the afg
or the environment around the bomb. >> but the bomb may have hit other metal objects that then splintered apart? >> this is what i'm hearing, although i certainly don't know that for a fact. the operations that we have performed are identical to the kind of work we would do in the army at a forward surgical team or combat support hospital. >> well, again, we know there is heroism, large and small at all times at mass general, and we thank you so much for joining us. i know you've got at least five surgeries today. we'll let you go back to work. >> thank you very much. >>> and coming up next here, a nation on edge. other cities in america, after the tragedy in boston. and chantix helped me quit. i honestly loved smoking, and i honestly didn't think i would ever quit. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. it put me at ease that you could smoke on the first week. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions wh
hard to let her do the things she wanted to do and keep it in a safe environment that we had some control over. and that was a difficult task and we worked long hours discussing it with her and what we felt was important and how she should behave. >> what went through my mind was initially the feeling that she was a teenager, i knew jill was very strong in hr personality and i knew that she was a good kid, a really good -- both my daughters are great kids. she was just exploring her sort of self-identity and i saw it as a way for her to become independent so i supported it. but it frustrated me that she was pushing away from the family. >> the day jill died i walked into her bedroom to wake her up around 11:00 am and i walked in and the dogs jumped up on the bed and she said a sweet hello to me. and i said i was concerned because she was sleeping late and i thought she should get up and get started on her day, because it was sunday. >> i came home and saw jill had been, she was awake and she was talking but she wouldn't talk to me. i thought she was just mad because i cut her
practice in the environments they're in all the time outside of school. >> and i would say that having listened to the word "media literacy" as far as back when i was carrying 3-inch quarter cassettes years ago and it was a great job. it really was. to teach media and digital literacy out of context is a fool's error and we have the boring curriculums in the world and teaching it out of the context. >> we have to stop blocking. >> yeah. i don't know. >> somebody -- okay. >> teachable moment. >> i hear everybody talk about -- >> thank you. >> yeah. so i have learned the phrase "teachable moment" since becoming a resource officer and i try to incorp rat that with a discipline situation and i try to use the teachable moment with the parents as well so you can move forward all together instead of just making everybody upset. >> i have some comments actually responding to what you asked about, the zero tolerance and different proposallity. one of my colleague and looked at this across the last 15 years and noticed a trend what we called "net widening and net deepening" and more behavi
to stormwater infrastructure to transport water away from the urban environment. one approach was to carry waste and stormwater through the same pipe. this combined system was less expensive than building two individual pipe networks. and stormwater was seen as a way to flush out the sewers. through the 19th century, the combined system was considered state-of-the-art throughout the world, and is still in use in many cities today. but cities constructed these systems before treatment was the standard. and even today's largest treatment plant doesn't have the capacity to treat the sudden volumes of water rushing through a combined system during rain. the plant is overloaded, and the excess rainwater, mixed with untreated raw sewage, is diverted straight into local waterways, creating a combined sewer overflow, or cso. there are over 700 communities in the united states with combined sewer systems. the other approach was to separate wastewater from stormwater, using two pipe networks. this separate system simply carries the stormwater away from the city. but even separate systems pollute the water
will make the environment better. we had approximately 1,000 overflows occur in 1999. today, we've reduced overflows by 45% to 50%. and it's going to continue to improve as we go forward with the rehabilitation program that's required under the consent decree. narrator: an important piece of the program is the construction of an 8-mile-long storage tank that will significantly decrease combined sewer overflows. man: right now, we're at the bottom of the rockdale construction shaft. we're 310 feet below grade, deep under atlanta in hard rock. in the downtown area of atlanta, the sewer system and the stormwater system are combined and there are overflows during storm events, and so the purpose of this system is to relieve that flow, take it into the tunnel, transport it to a brand-new treatment plant, clean up the chattahoochee river. narrator: instead of the combined sewage overflowing into the river, it will flow into this tunnel that acts as a storage tank. the water will then slowly empty into the new plant for treatment before it's released back into the river. man: the system in total
to reduce the infrastructure's impact upon the environment. on the front lines of protecting the beaches, are the crews that clean out the stormwater system. man: this big vactor truck works on the same principle as your vacuum cleaner in your house, only this thing sucks up the whole house. some of the storm drains collect a lot of trash. i started cleaning drains in '93. they were horrible because they hadn't been maintained so much. now this is a priority. you have trash, animal waste, and it ends up on our beaches. that is a health risk. that is one of the main reasons why we have to close the beaches after heavy rain. narrator: but even when it's not raining, water still enters the stormwater system, carrying pollutants. here on the west coast, a lot of our storm drain systems are separate from the sanitary sewer system, so if you dump something in the storm drain, it goes right to the ocean untreated. alamillo: we haven't had a major rainstorm in the last year or so yet there's a lot of water in this creek here. i would say 20% of it is natural and the other 80% is runoff. shapiro:
of making everything a process like public art would be really challenging in an environment like san francisco. so, i think every city is different. san francisco would be drastically affected if we adopted something that stringent. >> i just wanted to speak to -- a little bit to [speaker not understood] speaking about the vancouver program. and i do have some experience with that. ways also a coordinator of murals. and one of the benefits of having a process, whether that's a permit, whether there's a fee attached to that, whether there's a committee or if it simply goes through a process where different departments of the city can have input. for example, in vancouver and really the vancouver graffiti management mural program is almost identical to what tyra is talking about doing here. it's similar to public art murals, but similar in scope. when we were doing our murals, almost 200 of them, there was no permit in place, but there was a selection process. and, so, if that was the heritage property, that had to go to heritage. and they had to decide whether or not that building ha
... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] >> welcome back. the time is 6:41 a.m.. >> do women see themselves less accurately than strangers do? a new adult campaign says yes--and offers proof, in the form of a forensic sketches. >> this is just part of the commercial. dove for recruited seven women of different ages and backgrounds and had a san jose based fbi trained forensic artist, gil zamora, create composite sketches of them based on descriptions of their own facial features. some of the women use phrases like " my mom told me i had a big draw, " " i kind of have a set, rounder faces old. earlier in the day, the women had been asked to spend time with strangers, though neither party was told why. the strangers were later brought on by one on one in a room with the artists and asked to describe the women who have been sketched earlier. the two resulting from is a beach women were then, side-by-side--and the contrast is pretty stark. >> the tagline of the campaign is " you are more beautiful than you think. " >> we will be right back. ♪ you sig sned up weeks ago ♪
. the environment is not agreed to. >> a few minutes ago, the minority in the united states senate decided it was not worth it. they blocked common sense gun reforms even while the families looked on from the senate gallery. >> a big loss for president obama and big loss from the fam faps from newtown who traveled to washington to lobby lawmakers and they lost on the big amendment that was agreed to by democrat manchin and republican toomey. republicans that voted yes, toomey and kirk and collins from maine and mccain from arizona. democrats who voted no. hicamp from north dakota. prior from arkansas . begas from alaska and baucus and reid. >> at the white house it was technically more bipartisan. even hoe harry reid did vote the way he did. i was struck by the want president's comments just before we went on air when he let loose on with a tirade. now, i don't think it was likely anyway. but the president is not -- and that is the way he attacks today . if you read the president's comments simply on the attack of the fellow red state demdements. it is a searing indictment of them and the
salai. >>> there's now two tree sitters staging an environment show down. tonight a man from fort brag who was arrested in this incident earlier this month returned to the trees. the protesters say the highway 101 bypass will devastate wetlands and pollute waters that are home to salmon and trout. they say it includes a $50 million project to wildlife. >>> peacing together the boston bombings. we talked to experts on how video and pictures that may appear useless could help break the case. >>> carnival's cost. what the company is in the process of doing. >>> and we'll show you which areas will be the coolest temperatures and possible frost in the morning. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you engineer a true automotive breakthrough? ♪ you give it bold styling, unsurpassed luxury and nearly 1,000 improvements. the redesigned 2013 glk. the next great advance from mercedes-benz. starting at $37,090. >>> in campbell about a dozen people took part of a run. the informal run was organized by the owner of a sports shop. he said a number of his customers had qualified to run in the boston ma
and the rest of the middle east have more experience with terrorism. and their security environment reflect that reality. but here in the u.s., there is a delicate balancing act between liberty and security. and it's still a work in progress. bret? >> bret: steve centanni live here in d.c. steve, thank you. some of the most compelling accounts to come out of boston are from the eyewitnesses. and the people who tried to help. correspondent douglas kennedy has that part of the story. [explosion] >> the bomb that where to through boilston street took with it lives and dreams. in fact, many people in boston and the nation. especially those who saw the mayhem firsthand. >> it went off, you know, my ears, you know, just from the compression of the explosive device hit us and shattered the window next to us. and, you know, and i looked back and i see a cloud of smoke. >> it took probably five or ten seconds to realize what had happened because it couldn't happen there. so, it was just too surreal. >> still personal tragedy quickly turned into communal hope as the city almost instantly came togethe
are a vulnerable group. >> generally speaking you need the environment in which they were flourish and which they can work together. you need the context. >> rose: if they are good -- >> it will happen with the actor speaking the text and somebody listening. you don't need the director for that you need somebody to organize it all. >> rose: how much do you want to act? >> you know, i always juggled both. and i read -- as i joined strad for as an actor i read a piece of fla ubert that said most people in life end up what they do second best. >> rose: by dereking you are doing what you do second best? >> no first best. >> rose: as a actor you were seco best? >> other people could my the parts i was playing. i suppose i could see. i like to stand back and see the whole -- >> rose: it's an interesting idea because you think about shaping other things. the idea is how do you make a decision as to what it is you do best, not second best? and how do you drill down on that so you are truly being creative and bringing something that no one else has? i'm sure people are smart at self evaluation and th
. >>> there's now two tree sitters staging an environment show down. tonight a man from fort brag who was arrested in this incident earlier this month returned to the trees. the protesters say the highway 101 bypass will devastate wetlands and pollute waters that are home to salmon and trout. they say it includes a $50 million project to wildlife. >>> peacing together the boston bombings. we talked to experts on how video and pictures that may appear useless could help >>> in campbell about a dozen people took part of a run. the informal run was organized by the owner of a sports shop. he said a number of his customers had qualified to run in the boston marathon. >>> ktvu rob roth spoke to a former fbi agent with all the work involved to find those responsible. >> reporter: stitching together the many hours of video taken before, during and after the explosion is laborious but essential in solving the boston bombings. according to current and former law enforcement officials. rick smith says the fbi will use the videos to create a precised time line. >> who left the scene after or bef
? >> the average person? >> yes, absolutely. you can. >> what? >> when you go into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if the blast is from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass and severely injure or possible kill. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life
in arizona for the pat tillman run. >> it's not a secure environment, we can't put fences around it, can't put an officer every two feet, and we rely on all eyes out there. >> with so many groups out there, so many large events, regardless of the event, the security is knowing of the threat before the event occurs. that means intelligence and lots of cameras, electronic surveillance, and more law enforcement. >> i think the public, since 9/11, said we'll deal with that. >>> why finding out who carried out the boston bombing will help security officials everywhere. >> that was miguel marquez. we're learning more about this let goring to the white house. and now this letter, as we learned, is very, very similar to a ricin-laced letter set to a mississippi senator this week. we're awaiting this press conference with jay carney. >> yes, what i can tell you is that according to the street service on tuesday, a letter addressed to the president, that contained a suspicious substance, was intercepted at an off sight mail facility. if there is something suspicious or dangerous in it it can be sc
. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] has tested positive for the deadly >>> developing news out of washington, a letter intercepted on its way to capital hill has tested positive for the deadly poison ricin. it was addressed to republican senator and caught during a routine off-site screening. senator claire mccaskel said there is a suspect in custody. no word on who that person is. so far there's no connection to the boston bombings but certainly brings. >>> when those bombs went off in boston survivors scrambled to let their loved ones know they were okay. but the sudden surge was too much, crashing some cell phones. found out the bay area is just as vulnerable. >> that's right, when we have a major disaster the instinct now is to reach for your cell phone to call people or to check in and let people know you are all right. but when everyone tries to get on the network at the same time in the same localized area, no one can get on but now some silicone valley engineers are trying to fix that. >> the boston marathon bombings were the lates
environment. so we think they have got a number of positive stimuli going forward. probably a cheap as pe that emc has had for several years. lori: gene, make us some money here if you would. really interesting defensive stocks really led this rally. what do you think if we're coming down now? >> well, you know, leadership has been in a lot of different areas, and not just year-to-date but over the last year-and-a-half. david: forgive me, guys, i have got to break in here. we have american express express earnings. dennis, what are the numbers? >> yes the numbers beat the street on earnings but fall below revenue. street wanted 8.03 billion. earnings per share, american express, 1.15 a share. street was thinking $1.12. that is a beat. quarterlyly dividend for amex raised 15%. the company will spend $3.2 billion extra this year on stock buybacks before year-end and another one billion dollars in the first quarter of 2014. stock buybacks support a stock price. can't tell, looks like amex might head down. wall street hate as miss even though earnings beat. lori: todd horowitz, earnings seaso
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